About me

Lucas Battich

My name is Lucas Battich. I am a Ph.D. student in philosophy of mind and cognition at the Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences (GSN-LMU) and the Faculty of Philosophy, LMU Munich.

Areas of interest:
Social cognition, joint attention, perception, multisensory processes, philosophy of cognitive science

I am working on:

My doctoral project is focused on joint attention. I study how different senses shape joint attention and, conversely, how joint attention can affect perception across modalities. In my research I combine tools from philosophy, experimental psychology and psychophysics.

I have worked on:

Before coming to Munich, I obtained a B.A. (first class honours) in Philosophy at the University of Dundee, an M.A. in Communication at the Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam, and a Research M.A. (cum laude) in Philosophy at Radboud University Nijmegen, with specialization in Philosophy of Mind and Language, where I also completed courses in M.Sc. Cognitive Neuroscience and AI.

Publications

Battich, L., Fairhurst, M., & Deroy, O. (2020). Coordinating attention requires coordinated senses. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-020-01766-z

Battich, L. and Geurts, B. (2020). Joint attention and perceptual experience. Synthese. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11229-020-02602-6

Talks

08/2020 “The Openness of Joint Attention”. Tenth European Congress of Analytic Philosophy (ECAP 10).

09/2019 “Opening up the Openness of Joint Attention” (poster). Recent Developments in Situated Cognition: Empirical and Philosophical Investigations. Ruhr-Universität Bochum.

07/2019 “Joint Attention beyond Vision” (poster). Aegina Summer School on Social Cognition 2019: Norms & Biases in Social Interactions, Aegina, Greece.

08/2018 “Joint Attention and Common Knowledge: Assessing the Relational Approach”. Open Minds XIII Conference, The University of Manchester.

CVBE Projects

In this project, we propose that joint attention is a fundamentally multisensory phenomenon. We study how different senses shape joint attention and, conversely, how joint attention can affect perception across modalities.